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Victoria cancer agency building partially evacuated due to 'noxious odour'

The Saanich Fire Department says it was called to the building at 11:35 a.m. Thursday. (CTV News) The Saanich Fire Department says it was called to the building at 11:35 a.m. Thursday. (CTV News)
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Hazmat teams were called to the BC Cancer Agency building in Victoria on Thursday due to reports of a "noxious odour" in the building.

The Provincial Health Services Authority (PHSA) says the second floor of the building was evacuated because an unknown odour was coming from the pharmacy area of the building.

Firefighters, paramedics and CRD hazmat response technicians were called to the facility around 11:35 a.m.

BC Emergency Health Services says seven patients were transported to hospital during the evacuation.

Four other people were assessed by paramedics but were not taken to hospital for additional care. 

Around 3 p.m., the Saanich Fire Department said the situation was "stabilized."

The Royal Jubilee Hospital, which is connected to the BC Cancer Agency facility, was not affected by the incident, according to the PHSA.

However, the health services authority notes that traffic in the area was impacted near Bay Street and Richmond Road.

The PHSA says it's working with Island Health on the incident and are notifying any patients who have appointments at the BC Cancer Agency building about potential cancellations Thursday.

"The health of our staff, patients and visitors is our top priority," said the PHSA in a statement. "We are continuing to take every precaution as the situation evolves." 

Correction

A previous version of this story said the odour was discovered at the BC Cancer Clinic location in Victoria. In fact, it was located at the BC Cancer Agency building.

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